London Natural History Museum

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The London Natural History Museum is the best natural history museum in the world, and it’s free. Our kids were interested in dinosaurs, dinosaurs, and more dinosaurs. If yours are the same, and already roaring by the time you manage to say “di-“, then start with the Diplodicus skeleton in the central hall and head into the dino galleries.

Not only is there a Triceratops skull, and a full Baryonyx fossil, one of the largest meat-eaters ever unearthed in Europe, you’ll see uncannily life-like scale versions of  T-Rex and some other small carnivores that move and roar.

The exhibition has an above-ground walkway that gives an aerial view of dino specimens, if you’re tall enough to see over the railing. For tots and other shorties, the ground floor displays after the moving T-Rex have the most thrills. There are interactive educational hubs on dino food, dino nests, extinction, and even dinosaurs in popular entertainment.

You could spend the whole day in the museum hopping from creepy crawlies to undersea mammals and volcanoes. Call it a day, when you think it’s time.

Also worth noting: the picnic/loo area is a great place to change diapers, make friends, and save money by eating a brought lunch. You’ll find families and field trips here playing on the bleachers. The museum also has catering options. The main restaurant is well above average as museum eateries go, with stroller parking, balloons for kids (WHY???!!!), and decent salads and pizza.

Cromwell Road, South Kensington, SW7 5BD, Nhm.ac.uk

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Small Folk Travel

Small Folk Travel is a family travel site by mama and travel writer Taraneh Jerven. The Jerven family (two toddlers, one bun in the oven) travels incessantly. When researching our trips, we couldn't find the family travel coverage we were looking for. We did our own research. We wrote the family travel guides ourselves. Taraneh Jerven writes for international travel publishers including RoughGuides.com and DK Eyewitness Travel. We cover good stuff for discerning parents and their little ones. Often these overlap. If they don't, we take turns.

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